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The Road to Character de [Brooks, David]
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5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 1 opinión de cliente

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Número de páginas: 294 páginas Word Wise: Activado Tipografía mejorada: Activado
Salto de página: Activado Idioma: Inglés

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Críticas

Praise for David Brooks's "The Social Animal"
"Provocative . . . seeks to do nothing less than revolutionize our notions about how we function and conduct our lives.""--The Philadelphia Inquirer"
" "
"[A] fascinating study of the unconscious mind and its impact on our lives."--"The Economist"
" "
"Compulsively readable . . . Brooks's considerable achievement comes in his ability to elevate the unseen aspects of private experience into a vigorous and challenging conversation about what we all share."--"San Francisco Chronicle"
"Brooks surveys a stunning amount of research and cleverly connects it to everyday experience. . . . As in ["Bobos in Paradise"], he shows genius in sketching archetypes and coining phrases."--"The Wall Street Journal"
" "
"Authoritative, impressively learned, and vast in scope.""--Newsweek"
" "
"An enjoyably thought-provoking adventure.""--The Boston Globe"

Praise for "The Road to Character"
" "
"A powerful, haunting book that works its way beneath your skin."--"The Guardian "(U.K.)
"David Brooks--the "New York Times" columnist and PBS commentator whose measured calm gives punditry a good name--offers the building blocks of a meaningful life in "The Road to Character.""--"Washingtonian "("Four Books Washingtonians Should Be Reading This Month")
"Brooks, author of "The Social Animal, " offers biographies of a cross section of individuals who struggled against their own weaknesses and limitations and developed strong moral fiber. . . . [He] offers a humility code that cautions against living only for happiness and that recognizes we are ultimately saved by grace."--"Booklist"
" "
"The road to exceptional character may be unpaved and a bit rocky, yet it is still worth the struggle. This is the basic thesis of Brooks's engrossing treatise on personal morality in today's materialistic, proud world. . . . [His] poignant and at times quite humorous commentary on the importance of humility and virtue makes for a vital, uplifting read."--"Publishers Weekly"
Praise for David Brooks's "The Social Animal"
"Provocative . . . seeks to do nothing less than revolutionize our notions about how we function and conduct our lives.""--The Philadelphia Inquirer"
" "
"[A] fascinating study of the unconscious mind and its impact on our lives."--"The Economist"
" "
"Compulsively readable . . . Brooks's considerable achievement comes in his ability to elevate the unseen aspects of private experience into a vigorous and challenging conversation about what we all share."--"San Francisco Chronicle"
"Brooks surveys a stunning amount of research and cleverly connects it to everyday experience. . . . As in ["Bobos in Paradise"], he shows genius in sketching archetypes and coining phrases."--"The Wall Street Journal"
" "
"Authoritative, impressively learned, and vast in scope.""--Newsweek"
" "
"An enjoyably thought-provoking adventure.""--The Boston Globe"

Praise for "The Road to Character"
" "
"David Brooks's gift--as he might put it in his swift, engaging way--is for making obscure but potent social studies research accessible and even startling. . . . ["The Road to Character" is] a hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story. . . . In the age of the selfie, Brooks wishes to exhort us back to a semiclassical sense of self-restraint, self-erasure, and self-suspicion."--Pico Iyer, "The New York Times Book Review"
"A powerful, haunting book that works its way beneath your skin."--"The Guardian "(U.K.)
"Elegant and lucid . . . a pitch-perfect clarion call, issued not with preachy hubris but from a deep place of humility, for awakening to the greatest rewards of living . . . "The Road to Character" is an essential read in its entirety--Anne Lamott with a harder edge of moral philosophy, Seneca with a softer edge of spiritual sensitivity, E. F. Schumacher for perplexed moderns."--Maria Popova, "Brain Pickings"
"David Brooks--the "New York Times" columnist and PBS commentator whose measured calm gives punditry a good name--offers the building blocks of a meaningful life in "The Road to Character.""--"Washingtonian "("Four Books Washingtonians Should Be Reading This Month")
"Brooks, author of "The Social Animal, " offers biographies of a cross section of individuals who struggled against their own weaknesses and limitations and developed strong moral fiber. . . . [He] offers a humility code that cautions against living only for happiness and that recognizes we are ultimately saved by grace."--"Booklist"
" "
"The road to exceptional character may be unpaved and a bit rocky, yet it is still worth the struggle. This is the basic thesis of Brooks's engrossing treatise on personal morality in today's materialistic, proud world. . . . [His] poignant and at times quite humorous commentary on the importance of humility and virtue makes for a vital, uplifting read."--"Publishers Weekly"
Praise for David Brooks's "The Social Animal"
"Provocative . . . seeks to do nothing less than revolutionize our notions about how we function and conduct our lives.""--The Philadelphia Inquirer"
" "
"[A] fascinating study of the unconscious mind and its impact on our lives."--"The Economist"
" "
"Compulsively readable . . . Brooks's considerable achievement comes in his ability to elevate the unseen aspects of private experience into a vigorous and challenging conversation about what we all share."--"San Francisco Chronicle"
"Brooks surveys a stunning amount of research and cleverly connects it to everyday experience. . . . As in ["Bobos in Paradise"], he shows genius in sketching archetypes and coining phrases."--"The Wall Street Journal"
" "
"Authoritative, impressively learned, and vast in scope.""--Newsweek"
" "
"An enjoyably thought-provoking adventure.""--The Boston Globe"

David Brooks s gift as he might put it in his swift, engaging way is for making obscure but potent social studies research accessible and even startling. . . . [The Road to Character is] a hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story. . . . In the age of the selfie, Brooks wishes to exhort us back to a semiclassical sense of self-restraint, self-erasure, and self-suspicion. Pico Iyer, The New York Times Book Review
David Brooks the New York Times columnist and PBS commentator whose measured calm gives punditry a good name offers the building blocks of a meaningful life. Washingtonian

This profound and eloquent book is written with moral urgency and philosophical elegance. Andrew Solomon, author of Far from the Tree and The Noonday Demon
[Brooks] emerges as a countercultural leader. . . . The literary achievement of The Road to Character is inseparable from the virtues of its author. As the reader, you not only want to know about Frances Perkins or Saint Augustine. You also want to know what Brooks makes of Frances Perkins or Saint Augustine. The voice of the book is calm, fair and humane. The highlight of the material is the quality of the author s moral and spiritual judgments. Michael Gerson, The Washington Post
A powerful, haunting book that works its way beneath your skin. The Guardian (U.K.)

This learned and engaging book brims with pleasures. Newsday
Original and eye-opening . . . At his best, Brooks is a normative version of Malcolm Gladwell, culling from a wide array of scientists and thinkers to weave an idea bigger than the sum of its parts. USA Today
David Brooks breaks the columnist s fourth wall. . . . There is something affecting in the diligence with which Brooks seeks a cure for his self-diagnosed shallowness by plumbing the depths of others. . . . Brooks s instinct that there is wisdom to be found in literature that cannot be found in the pages of the latest social science journals is well-advised, and the possibility that his book may bring the likes of Eliot or Samuel Johnson another literary figure about whom he writes with engaging sympathy to a wider general readership is a heartening thought. Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker

If you want to be reassured that you are special, you will hate this book. But if you like thoughtful polemics, it is worth logging off Facebook to read it. The Economist
Brooks uses the powerful stories of people such as Augustine, George Eliot and Dwight Eisenhower to inspire. The Times (U.K.)
Elegant and lucid . . . a pitch-perfect clarion call, issued not with preachy hubris but from a deep place of humility, for awakening to the greatest rewards of living . . . The Road to Character is an essential read in its entirety Anne Lamott with a harder edge of moral philosophy, Seneca with a softer edge of spiritual sensitivity, E. F. Schumacher for perplexed moderns. Maria Popova, Brain Pickings
Brooks, author of The Social Animal, offers biographies of a cross section of individuals who struggled against their own weaknesses and limitations and developed strong moral fiber. . . . [He] offers a humility code that cautions against living only for happiness and that recognizes we are ultimately saved by grace. Booklist

The road to exceptional character may be unpaved and a bit rocky, yet it is still worth the struggle. This is the basic thesis of Brooks s engrossing treatise on personal morality in today s materialistic, proud world. . . . [His] poignant and at times quite humorous commentary on the importance of humility and virtue makes for a vital, uplifting read. Publishers Weekly"

Descripción del producto

In The Road to Character David Brooks, best-selling author of The Social Animal and New York Times columnist, explains why selflessness leads to greater success

You could say there are two kinds of virtues in the world, the résumé virtues and the eulogy virtues. The résumé virtues are the ones you list on your CV, the skills that contribute to external success. The eulogy virtues are deeper. They're what get talked about at your funeral and they are usually the virtues that exist at the core of your being - whether you are kind, brave, honest or faithful, what kind of relationships you formed over your lifetime.

In this urgent and soul-searching book, David Brooks explores the road to character. We live in a culture that encourages us to think about how to be wealthy and successful, but which leaves many of us inarticulate about how to cultivate the deepest inner life. We know that this deeper life matters, but it becomes subsumed by the day-to-day, and the deepest parts of who we are go unexplored and unstructured. The Road to Character connects us once again to an ancient moral tradition, a tradition that asks us to confront our own weaknesses and grow in response, rather than shallowly focus on our good points. It is a focus David Brooks believes all of us - including himself - need to reconnect with now.

Telling the stories of people through history who have exemplified the different activities that contribute to a deeper existence, Brooks uses the diverse lives of individuals such as George Eliot, Dwight Eisenhower and Augustine to explore traits such as self-mastery, dignity, vocation and love. He hopes that through considering their lives it will fire the longing we all have to be better, to find the path to character.

David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times and frequent broadcaster. His previous books include the bestsellers The Social Animal and Bobos in Paradise. His New York Times columns reach over 800,000 readers across the globe.


Detalles del producto

  • Formato: Edición Kindle
  • Tamaño del archivo: 1709 KB
  • Número de páginas: 294
  • Números de página - ISBN de origen: 081299325X
  • Editor: Allen Lane (14 de abril de 2015)
  • Vendido por: Amazon Mexico Services, Inc.
  • Idioma: Inglés
  • ASIN: B00R3C1U52
  • Texto a voz: Activado
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Activado
  • Lector de pantalla: Respaldados
  • Tipografía mejorada: Activado
  • Opinión media de los clientes sobre el producto: 5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 1 opinión de cliente
  • Clasificación en los más vendidos de Amazon: n°32,104 Pagados en Tienda Kindle (Ver el Top 100 Pagados en Tienda Kindle)

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Escuché unas entrevistas de David Brooks en televisión y pensé que sería un interesante tema. Me gustó la estructura del libro – primero describir el tema, luego dar ejemplos para enfatizar ciertos puntos y al final un resumen. Su forma de escribir es excelente en el vocabulario y estructura. Hay poca gente que escribe o habla con tanta claridad, sencillez y profundidad. Y es inspirador.
Después de leer el libro lo quise comentar con mis amigos y encontré varios videos en YouTube en el cual resume el libro y da algunos ejemplos. Aún con esta posibilidad, el libro vale la pena para aquellos momentos en que quieres inspirarte en la vida de otros. El reto ahora es escribir otro libros pero con ejemplos de personajes que no sean de Estados Unidos, quizás latinoamericanos.
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Amazon.com: 4.3 de un máximo de 5 estrellas 1,439 opiniones
363 de 395 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
3.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Interesting but not compelling 24 de abril de 2015
Por Freudian Slips - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Pasta dura Opinión del cliente de Vine de un producto gratuito ( ¿Qué es esto? )
I have opted for a "3" rating, which may be a little harsh for this well-written book, but that's because I found myself vacillating between enjoying parts of this book while disliking others. The book opens well with an interesting comparison of resume virtues vs eulogy virtues. Resume virtues are the accomplishments and skills we put on our resumes; eulogy virtues are the characteristics that are at the core of your being. Brooks then describes this contrast as Adam I vs Adam II and goes on to cite various examples of how our society has been taken over by resume virtues and Adam I beliefs and actions. He compares a football player's over-enthusiastic response to a touchdown with the more humble reactions to the US victory in WWII.

I enjoyed this opening discussion as well as several of the examples of individuals who had found their "vocation" (rather than "career") often through a circumstance in their life which propelled them toward it. Many times, their calling found them. I liked the emphasis on humility and the importance of being a good person not just doing good deeds. I also enjoyed reading about the Triangle Factory Fire and other incidents which pointed certain individuals toward their ultimate destinies. I truly admire the values he promotes and was pleasantly reminded of my father's generation which lived many of those values through WWII and other historic events.

But as I continued to read the book, I started to get a sense of "back in the good old days" nostalgia that implies (or blatantly states) that somehow suffering is the key to nobility and a good person. Stories are told of individuals who survived deaths of close family or children, endured hazing or torture, and it all started to sound a little preachy, no matter how eloquently it was stated. I am not someone who holds much for the "good old days"-- they weren't so good for women, minorities, the poor, etc. And Brooks acknowledges that early on, but he seems to forget that, and after awhile I grew tired of reading the book. For every person who survives a hazing/torture event and thrives, there are others who are crushed and destroyed, and I'm not sure that's because they lack character. It's inspiring to read about those who triumph in dire circumstances, but I'm left with trying to figure out what that means-- should life be harder, the rules be harsher so we will have greater character? There's a tone of "life was harder then" and forged stronger people, and I'm not sure I agree.

Bottom line-- it's an interesting and well-written book and I truly recommend the first portion of it But after that, I felt like I had gotten the point. It just wasn't as compelling to read after the first few chapters.
37 de 40 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas A Most Challenging Book to Review: Being Envied or Admired in Today’s Selfie Culture? 4 de octubre de 2015
Por Thomas M. Loarie - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Pasta dura Compra verificada
Writing an adequate review for best-selling author David Brook’s “The Road to Character” has been challenging. I typically work with five pages of detailed notes when reviewing a book but found myself with twenty-one pages for this review.

Brooks has written a gem of a book, one that raises the bar for future discussions of “character”. It takes time to absorb and savor. Brooks says publicly that he wrote this book to save his own soul.

“The Road to Character” is about the cultural shift from the “little me” to the “BIG ME,” from a culture that encourages people to think humbly of themselves to a culture that encourages people to see themselves as the center of the universe. This cultural shift encourages us to think about having a great career but leaves nothing for us to develop an inner life and character. For Brooks, we have lost our way to “being good” and “doing good.”

Brooks frames the discussion by contrasting “resume virtues” - those skills that one brings to the job market that contribute to external success – with “eulogy virtues” – those that are at the core of our being like courage, honesty, loyalty, and the quality of our relationships that contribute to real joy. These are embodied in two competing parts, Adam I and Adam II, of our nature that are a constant source of contradiction and tension.

Adam I is the external Adam. He wants to build, create, produce and discover things. He is characterized by actively seeking recognition, satisfying his desires, being impervious to the moral stakes involved. He has little regard for humility, sympathy, and honest self-confrontation, which are necessary for building character. He wants to have high status, win victories, and conquer the world.

Adam II is the internal Adam. He wants to embody certain moral qualities. He wants to love intimately, to sacrifice self in the service of others, to live in obedience to some transcendent truth, and to have a cohesive inner soul that honors creation in one’s own possibilities. Adam II is charity, love, and redemption.

Adam I is at work in today’s “BIG ME” culture. “Big Me” messages are everywhere; you are special; trust yourself; and be true to yourself. This ‘Gospel of Self’ begins with childhood when awards and rewards are given for just being, not doing. “We are all wonderful, follow your passion, don’t accept limits and chart your own course.”

This has led to an ethos based on a “ravenous hunger in a small space of self-concern, competition, and a hunger for distinction at any cost,” an ethos where envy has replaced admiration. This self-centeredness leads to several unfortunate directions: selfishness, the use of other people as a means to an end, seeing oneself as superior to everyone else, and living with a capacity to ignore and rationalize one’s imperfections and inflate one’s virtues.

The “BIG ME” culture distorts the purpose of our journey and the meaning of life. “Parts of themselves go unexplored and unstructured. They have a vague anxiety that their life has not achieved its ultimate meaning and significance. They live with unconscious boredom, not really loving, and unattached to the moral purpose that gives life it’s worth. They lack the internal criteria to make unshakable commitments. They never develop inner constancy, the integrity that can withstand popular disapproval or a serious blow. They foolishly judge others by their abilities and not by their worth. This external life will eventually fall to pieces.”

In this increasingly “BIG ME” culture, Brooks became haunted by the voices of the past and the quality of humility and character they exhibited. People in the past guarded themselves against some of their least attractive tendencies to be prideful, self-congratulatory, and hubristic. “You would not even notice these people. They were reserved. They did not need to prove anything in the world.” They embodied humility, restraint, reticence, temperance, respect, and soft discipline. “They radiated a sort of moral joy. They answered softly when challenged harshly. They were silent when unfairly abused, dignified when others tried to humiliate them, and restrained when others tried to provoke them…

But they got things done. They were not thinking about what impressive work they were doing. They were not thinking about themselves at all. They just seemed delighted by the flawed people around them. They made you feel funnier and smarter when you spoke with them. They moved through all social classes with ease. They did not boast. They did not lead lives of conflict-free tranquility but struggled towards maturity. These people built a strong inner character, people who achieved a certain depth. They surrendered to the struggle to deepen their soul.”

Brooks highlights the lives of prominent and influential people - Francis Perkins, Dwight Eisenhower, Dorothy Day, George C. Marshall, A. Philip Randolph, Bayard Rustin, George Eliot, St. Augustine, Samuel Johnson, Michel de Montaigne – to articulate the diverse roads taken by a diverse set of people, white and black, male and female, religious and secular, literary and non-literary. Not one of them was even close to perfect. They were acutely aware of their own weaknesses and they waged an internal struggle against their sins to emerge with some measure of self-respect..

“The Road to Character” is a “road less traveled.” It involves moments of moral crisis, confrontation, and recovery. To go up, one first has to go down (The “U Curve”); one must descend into the valley of humility to climb to the heights of character. Only then will one have the ability to see their own nature, their everyday self-deceptions, and shatter all Illusions of self-mastery.

Humility is central to the journey. Humility leads to wisdom, a moral quality of knowing what you don’t know and finding a way to manage ignorance, uncertainty, and limitation. It offers freedom…freedom from the need to prove your superiority. Alice had to be small to enter Wonderland. “Only the one who descends into the underworld rescues the beloved.”

The paradox for Adam I is that he cannot achieve enduring external success unless he builds a solid moral core as sought by Adam II. Without inner integrity, your Watergate, your scandal, your betrayal, will eventually happen. Adam I versus Adam II, Adam I ultimately depends on Adam II.

Brooks wrote this book to learn who has traveled this road to character, and what it looks like. He found you cannot be the good person you want to be unless you wage this campaign against self. I highly recommend this book as one of the most profound books published this year.

End note: Brook’s sections on love and suffering are excellent.
8 de 9 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
5.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas The Road to Character - a Must Read 3 de enero de 2017
Por Gerald S. - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Pasta blanda Compra verificada
To be brief about this, The Road to Character should be required reading and, perhaps more importantly, discussion throughout the 50 States. He begins by asking the interesting question of whether the individual wants to be remembered as his/her "Resume" or "Eulogy". Do we lead our lives fueled by a desire to establish a resume of success or to be remembered by others in a eulogy. He presents this approach by referring to Adam 1 (Resume of significance) and Adam 2 (Eulogy of a life well spent). Mr. Brooks understands that we human beings are complicated animals and that we are all fallible and subject to the lesser instincts of life. But he also understands that we have the ability to understand ourselves - to look inward and recognize those weaknesses - to become part of a greater good than the self. He chooses as multiple topics of conversation, a number of significant individuals in our history and he analyzes how these very different people dealt with themselves. We all, everyone of us, need to understand that heroism comes in many forms and one need not be - cannot be - without flaw. The trick is to understand oneself and view our roles as parts of the jigsaw of life where we can all play a part. "Character" means knowing ourselves and remaining loyal to our nobler aspirations despite those flaws.
2 de 2 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
4.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas liked it and now it's my turn 23 de enero de 2017
Por Sherrie - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Pasta blanda Compra verificada
I heard David Brooks reading excerpts from the book and decided to purchase for my husband. He read it, liked it and now it's my turn. I love David Brooks and the book starts strong--I love the chapters about individuals behind great accomplishments and movements (The Marshall Plan, Catholic Charities, Civil Rights) and who overcame their own less-than-sparkling selves (Eisenhower) to make the world a better place. In the final chapters, come of the characters aren't as compelling or David goes just too deep for my shallow self. But, the books leads to much thought and conversation, including--what will build character in current generations?
19 de 21 personas piensan que la opinión es útil
2.0 de un máximo de 5 estrellas Misleading Title 6 de agosto de 2015
Por BRYON BALINT - Publicado en Amazon.com
Formato: Edición Kindle Compra verificada
If you enjoy reading biographies or history, you will probably enjoy this book. It is generally well-researched and the some of the profiles appearing in chapters 2 through 9 are interesting. But the book does not present a "road to character" at all. In chapter 1 Brooks laments the character traits that he feels are valued today, and in subsequent chapters he presents examples of people that exhibit virtuous character traits. (As some other reviewers have said, by about chapter 7 the "back in the good ol' days things were better" feel gets tiresome). He doesn't make an effort to tie yesterday's "character" to today's character at all. Chapter 10, which is supposed to present his prescriptions, appears to have been hastily written and amounts to a checklist that says "try to be more like the people in chapters 2 through 9".

This was my first time reading Brooks so maybe fans of his will feel differently, but I was very disappointed.
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